Officer Safety Videos

Law enforcement officers face many different dangerous and stressful situations in the line of duty. Some, such as gun violence, are obvious; others dangers (e.g., fatigue) are hidden, but common, and can greatly hinder officer performance. 

NIJ supports work to study and improve officer performance and safety on several fronts. Watch the following videos to learn more.

NIJ media is copyright free. Please show and reuse it freely, but also review information on reusing and reposting media and legal disclaimers.

Video DetailsLinks to Media
Improving Officer Safety in Interactions With Citizens Suffering From Mental Illness
May 2017
Cara Altimus, former ASSS Fellow with NIJ, discusses the importance of law enforcement and first responders understanding mental illness, its causes, and how it affects the brain. She speaks about the correlation between drug addiction and mental illness.

Altimus also addresses establishing procedures and systems so that police officers and first responders can safely and successfully interact with individuals with drug addiction and/or mental illness.
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Understanding the Effects of Fatigue on Law Enforcement
May 2017
Steven James (Assistant Research Professor, Washington State University, College of Medicine) and Lois James (Assistant Professor, Washington State University, College of Nursing) discuss research on how fatigue and sleep deprivation affect officers when they make critical decisions to use deadly force. The researchers also discuss how often law enforcement officers are fatigued, the impacts of officer fatigue and drowsy driving, and the goal of implementing positive changes.
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How Best Protect Your Force Against Officer Suicide
May 2017
John Violanti, Research Professor at Buffalo, discusses the importance of making police departments aware that officer suicide is a problem. According to Violanti, police officers have a significantly higher rate of suicide than the general public. Reasons for this higher risk include the accumulative effects of trauma and stress.

Violanti describes steps police agencies are taking to help police officers, including teaching recruits what they may experience on the job. He also explains the need to change the culture so that police officers are more acceptable to seeking help when needed.
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View a complete list of videos available from NIJ.

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Date Created: May XX, 2017